from "Benjamin Hanks, Sr. of Pembroke, MA & His Descendants Updated October 1, 2005" by Kenneth Gene Carpenter,  527 - 77th Street Niagara Falls, NY 14304 United States

2. BENJAMIN2 HANKS, JR. (BENJAMIN1, JOSEPHA, THOMASB, THOMASC, THOMASD, GEORGEE, JOHNF) was born 16 Jul 1702 in Duxbury (Established Twp. Of Pembroke 1712), Plymouth County, and died 10 Jan 1787 in Mansfield, Tolland, CT. He married MARY WHITE 23 Apr 1724 in Marshfield, Plymouth, MA, daughter of RICHARD WHITE and KATHERINE ???. She was born 1704 in Pembroke, Plymouth, MA, and died 14 Feb 1772 in Mansfield, Tolland, CT.

Notes for B
ENJAMIN HANKS, JR.:
Benjamin Hanks Jr. son of Benjamin Hanks, Sr., of Pembroke and Plymouth, MA, and Mansfield, CT., yeoman, born 16 July 1702 in that part of Duxbury, MA, which was established in 1712 as the Town of Pembroke, died at Mansfield, CT., 10 Jan. 1787 (Bible record). He married at Marshfield, MA, 23 Apr. 1724, MARY WHITE, born probably at Plymouth, about 1704, died at Mansfield 14 Feb. 1772 (Bible record), daughter of Richard and Catherine White of Plymouth. Benjamin Hanks, Jr., on his marriage, moved to Saquish Island, in Plymouth Harbor, where all his children were born, their births being entered in the Plymouth records. On 19 July 1737 he bought from Oxenbridge Thatcher of Boston 126 acres of land in that part of Mansfield, CT., known as Chestnut Hill, two and one-half miles "westerly from the meeting house." On 10 July 1739 he took a lease for nine years of a forge or Iron mill in Duxbury from John Hanks, bloomer, of Duxbury, his brother, and on 19 Mar. 1740/1 he gave a lease of the same forge for seven years to Rawson Jackson of Duxbury. (Plymouth Deeds, 34: 65; 35:118.) After his brother John's death Benjamin Hanks of Plymouth, yeoman, for 75. 15s., old tenor, bought of Mary, his brother's widow, 10 acres in Duxbury; and the deed was recorded 4 Oct. 1743. (Plymouth Deeds, 37:134.) Meanwhile, on 23 Dec. 1742, Benjamin Hanks of Pembroke, yeoman, for 700, old tenor, had bought of Robert Bartlett of Plymouth, yeoman, a seven-eighth part of Saquish Island, in Plymouth Harbor, with dwelling house, Barnstable, and fences, and also two pieces of salt marsh or meadow "to the said Island adjoining," of which one piece "is the one Half of all that Marsh or Meadow that lyeth to the Eastward of the Marsh or Meadow belonging to Lemuel Morton of said Plymo--- said Meadow Iyeth in Common with John Bartlett who owns the other Half thereof; the other piece of Meadow lyeth adjoyning to a Point of sd Island called Rocky Point and is bounded on ye South East with the Meadow or Marsh belonging to ye Heirs of Nathaniel Morton late of said Plymo Deceased." This deed was recorded 2 June 1743. (Plymouth Deeds, 36: 20.) On 26 June 1745 Benjamin Hanks of Plymouth, yeoman, for 80 in bills of credit, bought of Nathaniel Thomas of Plymouth, Esq., the remaining one-eighth of the Island; and the deed was recorded 28 June 1745. (Plymouth Deeds, 37: 133.) On 1 May 1746 Benjamin Hanks of Plymouth, yeoman, for 275 lbs., sold to Lazarus LeBaron of Plymouth, physician, the whole of Saquish Island, together with a pew in the North West Gallery in the Meeting House of the first Precinct in the Town of Plymouth aforesd Said Pew is a Wall Pew being in Number 14," and 10 acres of land in Duxbury; and his wife Mary released her rights of dower. This deed was recorded 13 May 1746. (Plymouth Deeds,: 56.) About 1746 Benjamin Hanks moved with his family from Plymouth to Mansfield, CT., where he had bought land in 1737. There at Chestnut Hill, afterwards known as Hanks Hill, he built the spacious house which is still standing and has always been known as "The Mansion House." It is an old fashioned house, with fourteen rooms on the ground floor, a great Iron frame in the sitting room, and in the parlor beyond panels three feet wide, brought from England. The parish records of Mansfield show that Benjamin Hank's wife "Mary White Hanks united with the first Congregational Church in Mansfield in 1746 having that same year sold their pew, No. 14, of the Meeting House of the first precinct in Plymouth." In "The Mansion House" on Hanks Hill, Mansfield, Benjamin Hanks lived the remainder of his life, and there he died some forty years after his removal to Connecticut. At his death he owned considerable land and many cattle.

--Sources
Notes: New England Historical and Genealogical Register 1932 Vol. LXXXVI


After Benjamin's marriage to Mary White, the young couple moved to Saquish Island, in Plymouth Harbor, where all their children were horn. [The children's births are recorded in Plymouth VITAL RECORDS. ]

In 1737, Benjamin purchased 126 acres of land in Mansfield, Tolland Co., CT., from Oxenbridge Thatcher of Boston [Plymouth DEEDS 34:65 35:118] and in 1739 he took a lease on his brother's forge or Iron-mill in Duxbury for nine years. After his brother's death, Benjamin bought some of his property [Plymouth DEEDS 37:134]. In 1742 he purchased 7/8 of Saquish Island, with a house, barns, fences, salt marsh or meadow [Plymouth DEEDS 36:20]. In 1745 he bought the remainder of the island. [Plymouth DEEDS 37:133].
On about 1746, Benjamin removed to Mansfield, CT., settling at Chestnut Hill, which later became known as Hank's Hill. He "built a spacious house which is still standing and has always been known as "The Mansion House." [Tufts, p. 9]. It is described as "an old-fashioned house, with fourteen rooms on the ground floor, and a great Iron frame in the living room, and in the parlor beyond, panels three feet wide, brought from England."

"Mary White Hanks united with the first Congregational Church in Mansfield, in 1746, having that same year sold their pew, No. 14 (to Dr. Lazarus LeBaron) of the Meeting House of the first precinct in Plymouth," according to church records in Mansfield.

An old family bible used by Tufts, says that Benjamin Hanks died on 10 Jan 1787, in Mansfield, and his wife, Mary, died 14 Feb 1772, Mansfield, at the Mansion House.

According to HANKS AND OTHER ANCESTORS of MINE, by Edgar Freeman Hanks:

Benjamin Hanks, Jr., yeoman, second child and first son of Benjamin Hanks, Sr. and Abigail Heiford Hanks, was born 16 Jul 1702, in that part of Duxbury, MA which was established in 1712, as the Town of Pembroke. He was born during the year that Queen Anne Stuart succeeded William and Mary of Orange to the English throne. His father is recorded as being a 'husbandman' - a farmer. Benjamin Hanks, Jr. is recorded as being a yeoman, which was a freeholder, a rank in his day just below that of 'gentleman,'

Benjamin Hanks, Jr. married Mary White at Marshfield, MA. She was born (probably at Plymouth) about 1704, the daughter of Richard and Catherine White, who sailed from England with Benjamin's father. Mary and Benjamin moved to Saquish Island, now shown on US. Coast and Geodetic Survey Chart *245, as Saquish Neck. Saquish (pronounced Sake-wish) is a narrow strip of land about a mile and one-half in length and only 300 or 400 yards wide at high water. From Gurnet Point, where the Gurnet light-house is located, the land, formed like a crescent, extends in a westerly direction. Toward its western end is Fort Standish, and the neck terminates at Saquish Head.

Today it is possible to reach Saquish Neck by a specially constructed beach car. It consists of beaches, dunes and salt marsh, but there is a fertile soil, too, and full grown trees. There are a number of buildings. Some of these are small summer beach cottages. The entire neck is surrounded by tidal flats, which at full or new moon must dry out completely.

When Benjamin and Mary lived there they had to depend on a boat from the mainland for any outside support. As early as 1737, Benjamin had bought from Oxenbridge Thatcher of Boston, 126 acres of land in Mansfield, CT. On 10 Jul 1737, Benjamin took a nine year lease of a forge in Duxbury from his brother, John. The following year he leased the same forge to Rawson Jackson, of Duxbury, for seven years. After his brother John died, in 1743, Benjamin bought ten acres of land in Duxbury from John's widow, Mary (Delano) Hanks.

The forge, leased from John, is also referred to as an ' Iron-mill" and John has been termed a "bloomer." Bloom, in reference to metal, is a mass of malleable Iron from which the slag has been beaten off. A bloomery is an apparatus or establishment for making malleable Iron directly from the ore; also a pudding furnace. Specific mention of this interest by two of the Hanks brothers is made here to indicate the beginning of a trend in this direction, which continues down through the successive generations to Colonel Benjamin Hanks and two of his sons, Horatio and Julius.

Meanwhile Benjamin, Jr. had bought pieces of Saquish Island until he was the sole owner of the entire island. One wonders, since he made these purchases some year after he bought the Connecticut land from Thatcher, and later moved there, just why he desired complete ownership. In all probability, his reason was to be able to offer it for sale as an entity. (now in 1998 occupied by environmentalists)

On 1 May 1746: "Benjamin Hanks of Plymouth, yeoman, for 275 pounds, sold to Lazarus LeBaron, of Plymouth, physician, the whole of Saquish Island, together with a pew in the North West Gallery in the Meeting House of the first Precinct in the Town of Plymouth, aforesaid pew is a Wall pew, being number 14, and ten acres of land in Duxbury; and his wife, Mary, released her rights of dower." [Plymouth DEEDS 38:56].

After selling the land, Benjamin hanks, Jr. removed to Mansfield, Connecticut, with all his family. He was then forty-four, and Mary was forty-two. Abigail, the oldest child, was twenty; Silas, the youngest, was two.

One wonders how the children felt about leaving Saquish Island and the amphibious existence they had known since birth. With fish for the netting, oysters, clams and scallops readily tongued or dug, lobsters for the trapping, and water fowl in great number & to be brought down for the expense of a Little powder and shot. Yet, perhaps with only the everlasting roar of the surf and crying of the waterfowl, it was lonesome out there, and inconvenient for church, for school, and for purchasing necessities. Theirs must have been a very close-knit family, depending upon each other for household and husbandry chores. The seven boys were strung out at all ages, and as a consequence their father could assign chores to each, according to his age and ability. Abigail, who was only twenty when they left the island, must have been her mother's right hand, and very much a woman in her position of second in command of the large family.

Benjamin Hanks, Sr. had what it took to uproot himself from England, and start a new life in the colonies. Benjamin Hanks, Jr. bought and founded a family enclave continues to this day up on Hanks Hill in Mansfield, CT. When purchased, the land was known as Chestnut Hill, two and one-half miles "westerly from the meeting-house." Benjamin, Jr. had seven boys bearing the Hanks name, and a Little matter of time changed the name of the hill for long years to come, up until 1968.

On Hanks Hills Benjamin Hanks, Jr. built a house of fourteen rooms, all on the ground floor, which came to be known as the Mansion House. Mary White Hanks united with the First Congregational Church in Mansfield. Her widowed mother, Catherine White, came along to live with them. Catherine died there about 1757, leaving a large estate.

There are no pictures and no indication of Benjamin's character, other than what the legal records give. He lived for twenty-two years on Saquish Island. Of itself, this choice of location for a home fires the imagination.

In Mansfield, Tolland County, CT., he lived in the"The Mansion House" of his own building, up on "Hanks Hill" for forty-one years more, and died there 10 Jan 1878, in his eighty-fifth year, and after the Revolutionary War. His death is recorded in a bible. When he died he owned "considerable land and many cattle." To have lived self sufficiently for twenty-two years on an island, and to have acquired such an estate indeed shows great strength of character..